LIFE WITH...

 

AUTISM

Autism isn’t just a social thing. It’s a thing that’s there in the back of your mind and it’s always there. It tends to inhibit your ability to socialize and read social situations. But that doesn’t mean that it’s the end. With enough work, any person with Autism can have perfectly normal relationships. Want to get married? Sure! Want to do well with education? Well that’s easier for us. All I wanted to know when I first got diagnosed was to know that other people were in my boat, I needed to know I wasn’t alone. So that’s what I’m going to tell you. A diagnosis of autism isn’t the end, it’s the start of something, and an explanation for all of your weird behaviours – it opens doors. It actually makes you look more hireable; companies want people with Autism so that they can experience how amazing our brains are. 

 

’ll use a metaphor that helped me. 

We aren’t weird, our brains just run on a different operating system; everyone else uses windows, people develop it and it comes readily sorted. We’re on Linux, we develop it. We are the only people who can make us socialise well. So you may want to give up on the world, declare society a scam, heaven knows I did. But that’s no good for anyone, even if you get drained from a conversation with the postman. There is hope. And there are others like us, and your interests? Others have them; they aren’t weird.

You. Are. Awesome.

A MESSAGE THAT READS "YOU GOT THIS"

CEREBRALPALSY

THE ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM

When I was about a year old my parents noticed that I wasn’t rolling over. So they decided to go to the hospital to check I was okay. The doctors scanned my brain did some tests and that’s when we got told that I had CP, the doctors then proceeded to explain that it was probably due to the fact I had a lack of oxygen to my brain during birth, not to mention I was three months premature.

 No one knew how severely I would be affected by the CP but what they did know was whatever affect it had on me that’s what I would be stuck with because it was brain damage and therefore wouldn’t get worse over time which was definitely a big relief on my parents end.

 

By the age of four I was in a wheelchair full time and I started to notice that I was different from the other kids at school. 

I remember coming home one day and asking my dad what was wrong with me. He sat down next to me and said,  “Hannah your brain and your legs are in a fight and they don’t want to talk to each other”. That answer seemed to make perfect sense in my little four-year-old brain. I asked if “I would ever be able to walk”.

 I remember him saying “no” but I don’t remember being particularly phased by his answer I responded with an oh, ok and a cheery face and then just started to get on with life I suppose. 

 
 

DYLAN SAYS...

So my disability is a learning disability. my life with a disability can be hard at times but it can be awesome. so the bad things for me are that it’s hard to understand people who talk way to fast. I can only learn visually and sometimes teachers don’t understand how difficult it is for me to learn and they will get on at me but I just tell them hi I only learn visually Beacuse it means I can see the good things are that I’m unique and it makes me the person I am today how I deal with my challenges is by telling people to slow down how fast they are talking telling them I learn slower than them what I have learned from being disabled is that we’re all the same no matter disability or no disability and also my accomplishment are that I’m a para swimmer so I swim at Scottish and British and international competitions and that shows that we can all get some where and if you want to talk more about it contact me on Snapchat or instagram Snapchat username is dcswimming13 Instagram is official_dylan_bleakley.

 
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